Traditional Hijab: Ways to wear the Irani Chador

yeki

Because I have received several requests to explain how the chador it worn…voila, here we go. Okay first off there are pretty much innumerable ways to wear a chador, be it for prayer, around the house or outside. But there are some “general” styles that are used for each type of wearing and some styles are “regional” (if that makes sense).]

(I made some videos about how to wear a chador for prayer and around the house, but I have the chador down over my face, obviously for both one wouldn’t put the chador down over their face).

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First things first…

Just so everyone understands an Iranian chador looks like this; dscn2806

All it is, is a huge semi-circle of fabric. You can’t imagine how many *bazillions* of times I’ve had to explain this to sisters and random people. For some reason people think a Chador is like a Pakitani duppatta (long scarf) or like an Afghani burqa or something else. A traditional, *normal*, chador is shaped like the above. As par my first post on the chador I explained how there are other types of “chador” in Iran, like the new fangled chador-e melli or the Khaleeji abayaah raas that is called the “arabi chador” in Iran. But as regarding the traditional Iranian chador, it looks like above. They are very very very easy to make too, just get a long piece of fabric, drape it over your head to your feet, put a pin at the length you want, take it off, cut it at the pin, lay it out and then piece in the extra piece. sew that together and then hem so it’s a semi-circle. Voila…takes 1-2 hrs at tops. Ok, onwards we go… ***

Outside wear. People think if you wear a chador you just hold it under the chin and it flows down and around you. Rarely is this the case, first because the chador will fly open and isn’t as modest, plus it’s difficult to hold things or maneuver. Most outside chadors have a piece of elastic in the top part to keep it securely on the head. (like in the picture above). The elastic piece is popular with both young and older women, chador newbies and oldies, just a matter or personal taste. I always found the elastic gave me a headache.

(Style used when carrying packages)

(Style used when carrying packages)

(general style, most common, whether carrying a package or not, keeps chador clean and good if your sans a headscarf, making a quickie bread run)

(general style, most common, whether carrying a package or not, keeps chador clean and good if your sans a headscarf, making a quickie bread run)

(General style, she has 1 edge tucked up under her opp. arm to keep the chador from being cumbersome)

(General style, she has 1 edge tucked up under her opp. arm to keep the chador from being cumbersome)

(Similar style as above)

(Similar style as above, but both arms are out)

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Chador for prayer.

As par my last post about the chador, the most common way is just to drape it over you and then fold the edges under your arms for prayer, usually it’s a very loose style because usually you’d have a scarf and a long sleeved shirt/dress on anyway. When you don’t have a scarf on or a short sleeved shirt on you can wrap the chador closer to the body by keeping one edge tight under the opposite arm.

(common way for prayer, just tuck as you go...)

(common way for prayer, just tuck as you go…)

(Tucked under the arms so everything is covered, good for when you dont have a scarf or a long sleeved shirt on)

(Tucked under the arms so everything is covered, good for when you don’t have a scarf or a long sleeved shirt on)

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Chador around the house.

For wear around the house or working in the fields there are many many different ways of wearing and tieing the chador. Some are not very common but can still occasionally be seen. Really, all the styles are just whatever the women does with her chador to keep it out of her way while she’s working or cleaning.

Here are the styles shown in the video…

(chador ends tied at the waist in the back)

(chador ends tied at the waist in the back)

(from the front)

(from the front)

(chador ends tied behind the neck, this is used a lot for working in the fields)

(chador ends tied behind the neck, this is used a lot for working in the fields)

(criss-crossed, popular in southern Iran)

(criss-crossed, popular in southern Iran)

(chador is just thrown over the shoulders and wrapped around, popular in southern Iran)

(chador is just thrown over the shoulders and wrapped around, popular in southern Iran)

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